Navigation:

ER2 - Olena Fedyuk
ER3 - Julia Kubisa
ESR1 – Sara Lafuente Hernández
ESR2 - Mona Aranea Guillén
ESR3 - Dragos Adascalitei
ESR5 – Karima Aziz
ESR6 – Radek Polkowski
ESR7 - Ben Egan
ESR8 – Mateusz Karolak
ESR9 – Nina Sahraoui
ESR10 – Pille Strauss-Raats
ESR11 – Pedro Mendonca
ESR12 – Laurens Deprez

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ER2 - Olena Fedyuk
Besides the preparations for the November Annual Colloquium, the main activities in the last three months have been centred on the Theme 2 book. I am happy to see that all chapters (except one) are now in place and shaping up nicely: we’ve had many rounds of revisions, many more rounds of individual and group discussions, and an intensive workshop in October that really helped us to see the book as a collective work. It is also great to see Theme 2 not giving up their cinematographic dreams – the work on the book trailer gave us all a new dimension on teamwork and on our work with the book materials. I am now looking forward to see the Theme cracking down on editing of the book trailer in November, after the annual colloquium.

Besides Theme work, this fall I had the honour of giving a talk at the Goldsmith’s University Seminar Series: ‘Economies of ‘Care’ and Social Reproduction’, where I spoke of my PhD research and materiality of care-work. Also, a pleasant surprise has been that my film project Olha’s Italian Diary was selected among the 14 film projects for an industry program of Budapest Documentary Film Festivals in September this year. We did not win any awards yet  but it was great to try to work out the mysteries of the documentary filmmaking and producing and to try a hand in bridging research and filmmaking. I am particularly grateful to CE for these opportunities! Finally, this Fall two of my chapters came out as contributions to edited volumes: ‘Growing up with migration: Shifting roles and responsibilities within the transnational families of Ukrainian care-workers in Italy’ in the edited volume by Kontos and Bonifacio In the Dark: Family Rights and Migrant Domestic Work published with Palgrave and ‘Transnational parenthood’ for a Routledge Handbook on Immigration and Refugee Studies (ed. Anna Triandafyllidou).
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ER3 - Julia Kubisa
The last three months were quite fruitful and interesting for me in terms of work activities and academic development. I am getting more and more occupied with the subject of job quality, which is the topic of the edited volume that I am preparing with Tommy. The discussions with Pedro, Pille and Laurens over their research and common work over the article on job quality in chosen organisations and sectors were very inspiring. Together with Tommy I chaired a stream on work quality at the WORK2015 conference in Turku, Finland. It turned out to be a great opportunity to listen to researchers from all over the world and compare our research outcomes and views on the subject. I could discuss the similarity of the situation of nurses in Poland (which was the topic of my PhD thesis) and the nurses in Australia, as it was the topic of one of the presentations. I found it interesting not only in purely academic terms, but also from the perspective of public sociology. I think the more academic knowledge we collect, the more important it is to share it with a broader audience and to speak about the situation of the social groups that we do research about, and to engage in public debates. Regarding the level and quality of knowledge that is collected within the ChangingEmployment Network, I think there is a lot to talk about publicly, and to engage in the discussions on the future of working lives, not only in academia but also in the broadly understood public sphere.

Apart from theoretical inquiries on job quality I have spent some time on my article about the gendered division of protests of miners and nurses in Poland, which I am writing for the Transfer special issue on strikes and protests in Europe. In July I did some interviews with miners in Zabrze (Silesia region in Poland), who organised very interesting and inclusive protests against the closure of their mine in autumn 2014 – winter 2015. I used the opportunity to have a closer look at the everyday reality of the mine. Unfortunately I did not go down the mine pit, however I visited the underground tunnels of another mine, which is not active anymore and is open for tourists. The tour around Makoszowy Mine gave me an idea of how the industrial, physical work is being performed in the early XXI century – and how dangerous it still is.
I took some pictures that can be seen here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/129977554@N07/albums/72157655948528371

In September I presented the draft version of the article at the IREC2015 conference in Gothenburg. It was well received and I had inspiring comments. I am continuing my work with the article and perhaps the idea of studying the gendered division of protests and the gendered division of work will develop into something broader next year.
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ESR1 – 
Sara Lafuente Hernández
My last Marie Curie secondment is just over. I was lucky enough to be in Eurofound (Dublin) for the last three months and get involved in two projects in the Working Conditions and Industrial Relations Unit, on the articulation between European Works Councils and national employees’ participation and consultation institutions, and on the representativeness criteria (mandates and geographical dimension) of social partners involved in Sectoral Social Dialogue Committees. My conclusions will eventually be included in two reports, but above all, I got to know how the institution works and more about some ongoing very interesting projects (e.g. the creation of a database on Sectoral Social Dialogue in the long run). I could also exchange with other researchers in IR (Eurofound, Hans Böckler Stiftung, University College Dublin, European Lawyers for Workers’ network), attended conferences and workshops (e.g. Colin Crouch and Roland Erne; EF Advisory Committee) and improved my fluency in English (Gaelic coming soon!). Finally, I could attend a plenary meeting of the SSDC Electricity in Brussels as part of my PhD fieldwork. As final reward, the issue of the revue Travail Emploi Formation 13/2015 I coordinated has just been published!

In general, Dublin has been a great experience for me, I have learned a lot about the Emerald Isle: astonishing landscapes, ‘troubled’ political history and current society. I still have much to discover though, hopefully very soon! But now it is time to lock me up and write the thesis. Slainte!
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ESR2Mona Aranea Guillén
I have spent most of the summer on maternity leave (July-October). In August my second daughter (who is also our second network baby since 2012!) was born in Germany. The most important task ahead for me is now to settle down again in Oviedo with my husband and kids and start the final phase of the Marie Curie program and my PhD project.

In my first week back on the job, I have visited the German meeting of works council members (Deutscher Betriebsrätetag, 27th to 29th of October) in Bonn. This conference brings together practitioners from German works councils with academic experts and trade union leaders. For me this has been an excellent opportunity to exchange knowledge with employee representatives from companies that are not directly part of my research. I was also able to enhance my knowledge on German co-determination visiting lectures on labour law and labour conflict.

During maternity leave I was able to travel a bit further on the long and stony path towards the publication of research results. For this most of the credit has to go to my co-authors. Together with my supervisors at UniOvi, Prof. Holm-Deltev Köhler and Dr. Sergio González Begega, I have revised and re-submitted a paper on European Works Councils for the Warsaw Forum of Economic Sociology. Sara (ESR1), Dragos (ESR3) and myself have handed in our first joint Theme 1 paper for the Changing Employment Research Paper Series, dealing with collective bargaining in Romania and Spain after the crisis. In October I have submitted an article on the theory of multinational corporations to the Human Relations Journal.
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ESR3 - Dragos Adascalitei
Since our last newsletter I have focused on writing up several articles and organizing my schedule for the next year. In September, I have presented my research at the IREC conference in Gothenburg, which was a very good event. Also, it was a nice opportunity to meet our Theme 3 colleagues and get to know the Department of Sociology and Work Science at the University of Gothenburg. In January-February 2016 I will relocate to Glasgow for a month in order to complete my academic secondment.
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ESR5 – 
Karima Aziz
After spending the summer in between places and presenting at the ESA conference in Prague in late August with many colleagues of our network, I moved back to London in early September. This was a curious timing for me since the refugee crisis had just started reaching Vienna, where I had spent most of my summer. I was as many others overwhelmed by the readiness of many people to help and at the same time by the obvious incompetence of the Austrian and other governments. However, I went to London with the impression of a more activated civil society and when I arrived here I also had that impression with Jeremy Corbyn being elected Labour party leader and the big support for the demonstration for refugee aid (see picture). I was lucky to be able to move back into my old flatshare in East London, although I had to get used to the new flatmate – Atticus the cat (named before the second novel by Harper Lee was published). I finally finished my short film entitled ‘A Women’s Forum’ and am curious about the audience’s reaction as well as my protagonists’ themselves. In terms of writing I have contributed to our Theme 2 book project and am drafting my empirical thesis chapters. This endeavor takes a lot of resilience as well as creativity in finding the best way to present the rich and complex data collected through biographical narrative interviews.
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ESR6 – Radek Polkowski
Many interesting things have been happening in my research work since the last newsletter. In August I took part in the summer academy co-organised by Humboldt University (Germany) and Sogang University (Korea) ‘Work and Non-Work in Global Perspective. Resonances, Connections, Contradictions’. The school was an excellent opportunity to meet historians and sociologists of work from all over the world and also a good chance to get constructive feedback on my research as well as to screen my documentary ‘Our Kingdom’ for the first time in public. Right after this event I went to Prague for the ESA conference. As the summer ended, I got back to the usual stuff, which is further developing my conceptual framework and utilising it in chapters for our upcoming book by Theme 2. Meanwhile, I have also written several posts on my koreathruimage.wordpress.com blog.
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ESR7 - Ben Egan
I have been undertaking interviews over recent weeks with union officials and managers from the company that forms the basis of my doctoral case study. Though somewhat behind schedule my intention remains to complete all these before the end of my funding for full-time employment in February. I am also fine-tuning some of the conceptual parts of my thesis and learning the practical difficulties of Nvivo. Beyond the PhD I have been finalising my two contributions to the book project of Theme 2 and editing the film ahead of the colloquium to include subtitles.
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ESR8
– Mateusz Karolak
The last three months, except a time of annual leave, have been mostly a period of intense writing. In September I submitted a paper to the Central Eastern European Migration Review and wrote two chapters to the Theme 2 book. The first one was devoted to changes in migrants’ perception of employment standards before and after their migration. The second one, co-written with Nina and Radek, was about the polarization of the EU vs. non-EU migration policies and its exceptions. In October during the Theme 2 book workshop at Ross Priory I had a great opportunity to discuss my work with other contributors. The stunning views of Loch Lomond and Scottish mountains with towering Ben Lomond brought appropriate level of concentration. I wish I had known this beautiful place last year during my secondment in Glasgow.

Moreover, in the beginning of October together with my colleagues from the University of Wroclaw I took part in a book workshop at Science Po in Paris. Adam and I presented a book chapter on unions and young people’s responses to the expansion of precarious employment in Poland. Last but not least, I have started teaching classes in sociology of film for undergraduates. Although it is only once a week, I really enjoy it and I am also learning a lot.
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ESR9 – Nina Sahraoui
After a short break in the beautiful cities of Portugal, I was busy over summer and since then with the writing up of findings. I presented some of these findings at the European Sociological Association Conference in Prague at the end of summer in the framework of a Theme 2 Changing Employment panel. Most of past weeks were spent writing and I had another opportunity to receive some feedback at the ‘Corporate Care’ workshop at Goldsmiths University at the end of October. The format of the workshop allowed for focused and fruitful debates. In October I also had my first teaching experience! A three hours class with second-year undergraduates studying ‘Researching Cultures and Communities’. A little anxious before the class, I enjoyed the interactions with students a lot and look forward to future teaching experiences.
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ESR10 – Pille Strauss-Raats
After the summer vacation spent at home with friends and family, the return to working life for this term began with a conference trip to Turku, Finland – an exciting opportunity to present the first findings of my questionnaire survey in Poland. The organization of the conference was excellent, presentations interesting and Turku itself beautiful, so it was an inspiring start for the ‘new year’ at the university.
Besides the personal highlights of sending kids to new schools and learning to sail in true Swedish west coast spirit, end of summer and beginning of autumn was spent preparing the final steps of my fieldwork – this time the factory survey in Borås. With the help of colleagues at the department, everyone at the factory and wonderful research assistants recruited among the students, it all finally came together in October and now I am enjoying the process of discovery of the new data and drawing it all together. Thank you all and I am looking forward to interesting discussions on first results at the annual colloquium in Glasgow soon!
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ESR11 – Pedro Mendonca
I wonder where is gender in my research

My fieldwork in the Scottish Spirits Industry is coming to an end, and with it the most exciting part of the whole research project. It was a great experience trying to make sense of all the (new) information gathered through interviews, union meetings and observations in distilleries, cooperage sites and factories throughout a whole year. One thing that stood out (and wasn’t accounted for in the beginning of the research) was the gender issue. Where and how to place gender in the supply chain dynamic has become a relevant question for my research project. It’s not only because gender has been a controversial topic in manufacturing work (Cavendish, 1982), but also because this research project gives a great opportunity to look at the gender problematic through a supply chain perspective. How are gender issues shaped on the shop floor in an era of flexibility, where manufacturing firms are pressured to organise production on a 24/7 basis as a response to supply chain demands? Do the new forms of production grounded on networks bring new gender inequalities in a manufacturing context? These are all questions I would like to be able to answer with my research.
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ESR12 – Laurens Deprez
Since my last update I have decided to brush up on my programming, because of personal interest, but also to sort of ‘look under the hood’ of my subject group, ICT professionals and software developers. It seems fruitful to at least try to go through the same motions as them, and gain a deeper knowledge of the technology they use on a daily basis, especially considering that all technology is designed with a specific use in mind, reflecting existing social relations. In order to make any relevant statements to that end I have picked up a course on object-oriented programming.
The other thing I have been mainly spending time on (aside from the perpetual struggle to get more data through the diffusion of my survey) is putting the finishing touch on my papers regarding the sharing economy and perhaps more relevant for my topic, the agile software development method many developer teams use. I gave a presentation on this topic in late August while I was on the WORK 2015 conference in Turku, Finland with my fellow theme mates from theme 3.
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Navigation:







ESR1 – Sara Lafuente Hernández



ESR2 - Mona Aranea Guillén



ESR3 - Dragos Adascalitei



ESR5 – Karima Aziz



ESR6 – Radek Polkowski



ESR7 - Ben Egan



ESR8 – Mateusz Karolak



ESR9 – Nina Sahraoui



ESR10 – Pille Strauss-Raats



ESR11 – Pedro Mendonca



ESR12 – Laurens Deprez







Back to eNewsletter Main Page



ESR1 – Sara Lafuente Hernández



During the last months, I have been working hard on a paper on the European sectoral social dialoguecommittee (SSDC) of electricity, which I presented in the IREC Conference 2014 in Dublin. I had very fruitful discussions on it with Eurofound experts and other researchers in the field of European industrial relations, and I could also get useful feedback from my Theme 1 colleagues in a workshop organized in Brussels. I submitted my paper to the ChangingEmployment Research Paper Series and will submit an article for a journal, so hopefully you will be able to discover soon my findings on-line or in printed version. My hypothesis there is that the SSDC of electricity is used for partner-lobbying instead of for bilateral negotiation because the representativeness criteria and the sector’s definition at the EU and national levels differ. Institutional designs imply structural misfits across levels, which unequally affect trade unions’ and employers’ capacities of representation. The findings raise both a challenge for quantitative research in European IR and policy implications for European institutions and trade unions’ strategies. I expect to soon discuss these preliminary findings in interviews with social partners at the EU level.







Besides two Theme 1 meetings, the very interesting visit to ILO and our mid-term Annual Colloquium in Wroclaw, I also attended several conferences and seminars outside the network (i.e. Europe at a crossroads, organized by ETUI http://www.etui.org/Events/Europe-at-a-crossroads.-Which-way-to-quality-jobs-and-prosperity







Allocation universelle: liberté ou précarité?, organized at the ULB http://fsp.ulb.ac.be/fr/conferencedebat-allocation-universelle-liberte-ou-precarite







I await now a coming seminar organized by Europe et Société in Paris on European sectoral social dialogue, where I expect to get a direct insight on employers’ views on EU sectoral social dialogue through informal participatory observation. Then, I will have my first lectures to Master students in Sociology of work at the ULB. This will be a short farewell-teaching experience, since I will start my secondment in Oviedo after the winter holidays! 







For those coming now to Belgium in secondment, I leave here a few curious but worthwhile visits related to the world of work which I recently discovered myself. Enjoy your stay!







Exhibition of Constantin Meunier (1831-1905) in Musée Royaux des Beaux Arts (Brussels), until 11 January 2015. He was a realist Belgian artist reputed for his sculptures of industrial workers, dockers and miners, and in tribute to Work: http://www.expo-meunier.be/en/home







Old Mining site in Le Bois du Cazier (Marcinelle), near Charleroi, which has been turned into a Museum of the Industry of Wallonie since a tragic accident occurred there in 1956. So it is like a memorial for miners and industrial workers: http://www.leboisducazier.be/







Museum about industry, labour and textile (Ghent). If you visit the lovely city of Ghent (I strongly recommend it) and need to warm up in the middle of the freezing Belgian winter, have a look at this charming exhibition on industrial history. Almost everything is in flemish, but despite this inconvenient for foreigners, a true Mule of Jenny spinning machine awaits you inside, which is a piece of history and symbol of the industrial revolution (Marx even mentioned it in The Capital, apparently).http://www.miat.gent.be/en







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ESR2 - Mona Aranea Guillén



As Early Stage Researcher and Phd Candidate placed at the University of Oviedo, Spain, I am doing research on employment relations in multinational corporations on the European level. My case studies are located in the steel sector and the insurance sector.







At the moment I am based at the European Trade Union Institute (ETUI) in Brussels. My term as an ETUI visiting researcher (Sept -Dec 2014) has been immensely fruitful in terms of data provision, academic training, dissemination of my research and personal networking. From January until March I will be on secondment at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) where I will be supervised by Pierre Desmarez at the Centre METICES.







At my home institution in Oviedo I have completed the first year as a Phd candidate. I have received valuable and encouraging feedback after presenting the state of my research at the sociology department’s annual “Phd Day” that took place in September.







Using initial findings from my fieldwork, I have written a paper on European Framework agreements that has met much interest at the Industrial Relations in Europe Conference (IREC) which took place in Dublin, Ireland in September. My presentation there was titled “European Framework Agreements (EFA) and the transnationalization of institutional power: the challenge of implementing the ArcelorMittal EFA in Germany and Spain”. The paper is currently under revision for the Changing Employment Research Paper series.



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ESR3 - Dragos Adascalitei



During the last couple of months I have been busy with writing up two papers based on fieldwork data from Romania. Both of them were submitted to journals which are supposed to come back to me with a reply by the end of January. In the meantime, I am busy with organizing the final details of my secondment at the International Labour Organization (ILO) which will start sooner than expected, on 15 of January 2015. As it looks now, at the ILO I will contribute to one of the chapters for the forthcoming publication 'World Employment and Social Outlook'. Besides, in the upcoming year I will work on two Changing Employment papers. The first one is a Theme 1 common paper that will compare workplace adjustments during the recent crisis in Spain and Romania. The second one, is a co-authored paper with Ben Egan, which will focus on the impact of migration on union organization in Romania and United Kingdom. Finally, I plan to spend a couple of weeks next year in Romani – doing fieldwork in an automotive plant.



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ESR5 – Karima Aziz



In September 2014 I moved to Wrocław, Poland, for my placement at the Institute of Sociology of the University of Wrocław. The timing was just right, because I had finished my fieldwork in the UK and came to Poland a couple of weeks before the academic semester officially started. That way I had the possibility to take advantage of the offer the university provides for international students like a two-weeks language course, welcome events and information days. Through this I learned a lot about the city and the university and met other people, who are also in Wrocław for the first time, which really made my start in Wrocław a lot easier. Later when the semester had started I also took advantage of the offer of lectures of the MA in intercultural mediation, the semester Polish language course and I try to integrate in the institute joining meetings of the department. I got the chance to stay in the same place as some of my theme colleagues, since when I arrived Radek was here and will come back again for his second round of Polish fieldwork and Mateusz came a month after my move back from his placement in Glasgow at the University of Strathclyde. This framework made my placement very enjoyable and despite me being worried about finding respondents I managed to find interviewees through contacts from interviewees in the UK, snow-balling in Poland, friends of friends and online calls especially on Facebook.



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ESR6 – Radek Polkowski



It has been a busy period since last newsletter. My secondment at the University of Wroclaw came to an end in September and right after this I went to north of Ireland to conduct follow-up interviews exactly one year after my first interviews. I stayed there for almost entire October, travelling across country to meet my interviewees. I also used this time to take videos and photos around Belfast for my short documentary film. In the beginning of December I will participate in the media training at CEU where I can work on the collected material. I have also presented my research at the PhD Away Day at the University of Strathclyde. In the meantime, I have been working on the working paper for ETUI, drafts for the theme 2’s special issue for FOCAAL, the chapter for our book project, and a chapter for my PhD thesis.



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ESR7 - Ben Egan



ESR7, Ben Egan recently completed his secondment at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow and has returned to Leuven to finalise his conceptual framework in anticipation for commencing field work in the New Year. He has also been engaged in various dissemination activities, which have served as a useful platform for feedback on the developing framework. These include the annual PhD symposium for the British Universities Industrial Relations Association, which was held in Leeds, and being a guest speaker for the Newcastle University Business School’s research seminar series.



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ESR8 – Mateusz Karolak



With the beginning of October I said goodbye to Glasgow and became a return migrant myself, again. The months which followed I mainly devoted to the writing up the newest findings from the fieldwork as well as to the preparation to the Network Annual Colloquium and after-all-not-so-scary Mid-term review. The interesting and enriching experience was also to coordinate the 3-days long visit of prof. Guy Standing at the University of Wrocław. Sometimes provocative statements of the author of The Precariat… became a good opportunity to discuss with other fellows What Is the Alternative, and how to deal with the T.I.N.A. approach. Hopefully we will continue our talks on the Changing Employment Blog. As for future, in the January I am moving to Brussels where I am going to have a placement at the European Trade Union Institute. Moreover I will also attend in the IMISCOE 3CI PhD Conference ‘Changing Europe – Changing Migration’: Europe in the World on the Move.  



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ESR9 – Nina Sahraoui



Since October I’m conducting fieldwork in Madrid with migrant care workers. It’s a great adventure and apart from very interesting interviews with the workers I had the chance to take part in the activities of various migrant associations. I’ve learned a lot through them and through their work. Living in Lavapies, a multicultural district of Madrid, I’ve also discovered a vibrant local community with many grassroots movements that enrich the neighborhood through arts and social engagement. Time goes by so fast but I’m trying to make the best out this very thought-provoking environment to take bits and pieces of this environment back with me. This fieldwork constitutes the third and last part of my fieldwork after having conducting similar interviews with migrant care workers in London and Paris. This 3-sited research has been incredibly enriching but I also have the feeling that the more I get to see and hear the more questions I have! 



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ESR10 – Pille Strauss-Raats



The time leading up to Christmas is beautiful in Sweden – there are lots of Christmas lights and manyoccasions for ‘fika’ with glögg and pepparkakor among friends and colleagues - an excellent time for social bonding and just to the point of my research!







The work itself is progressing as planned, with main focus on the questionnaire survey. The challenge here is finally being forced to ‘tune down’ my research area - so many aspects of the research context seem to be interesting and of course absolutely relevant for my research questions but it is time to admit that one project cannot cover it all. In addition to the continuing comparative focus on the regulation and outcomes for health and safety in agency work, the project is (re)turning deeper into the psychological processes of social support and wellbeing in this specific setting. I have been lucky to be able to take part in two research networks in these areas this fall through ESRC seminar series: the one on regulation of work and employment, lead by the Newcastle University Business School and another on current challenges in sustaining employee wellbeing, lead by the University of Edinburgh. Both seminar series have been very valuable for gaining theoretical understandings and an overview of current discussions in these fields. And of course, as always, it was good to exchange ideas within our own Changing Employment network during our annual colloquium in November – I am looking forward to putting all the valuable inputs to practice in the coming months.







For now, best Christmas wishes from beautiful Gothenburg! 



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ESR11 – Pedro Mendonca



The completion of theme 3 will be undoubtedly forever linked to Poland, where the ITN network school took place in November. It was in Wroclaw, Poland where the theme 3 met its final member and ER – Welcome to the ‘job quality’ Julia! Personally this is of much importance, because now I can practice and improve my Polish; and it also meant that I was introduced to one of the best dishes that I ever tried – pierogi – I prefer the baked ones to be honest! 



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ESR12 – Laurens Deprez



The Wroclaw network school came and went. I have to say I didn’t look forward to this, seeing as we would be evaluated by the EU commission and Poland not exactly being on the top of my ‘places to go’ list. The gazillion presentations and interviews to look forward to didn’t help either. As happens so often with that attitude, it went quite above expectations: Polish food is great, and I have never seen a city centre outside the lowlands look more like my native town than Wroclaw. Very surprising.







On a scientific note: I am being engrossed by the open source community and the interesting debates going on in there. Suddenly I have the feeling this makes my thesis a lot more relevant for society, which is a huge boost to my motivation. During the poster presentation in Wroclaw many people approached me and asked me for my contact data, so that is nice as well.



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Navigation:







ESR1 – Sara Lafuente Hernández



ESR2 - Mona Aranea Guillén



ESR3 - Dragos Adascalitei



ESR5 – Karima Aziz



ESR6 – Radek Polkowski



ESR7 - Ben Egan



ESR8 – Mateusz Karolak



ESR9 – Nina Sahraoui



ESR10 – Pille Strauss-Raats



ESR11 – Pedro Mendonca



ESR12 – Laurens Deprez







Back to eNewsletter Main Page



ESR1 – Sara Lafuente Hernández



During the last months, I have been working hard on a paper on the European sectoral social dialoguecommittee (SSDC) of electricity, which I presented in the IREC Conference 2014 in Dublin. I had very fruitful discussions on it with Eurofound experts and other researchers in the field of European industrial relations, and I could also get useful feedback from my Theme 1 colleagues in a workshop organized in Brussels. I submitted my paper to the ChangingEmployment Research Paper Series and will submit an article for a journal, so hopefully you will be able to discover soon my findings on-line or in printed version. My hypothesis there is that the SSDC of electricity is used for partner-lobbying instead of for bilateral negotiation because the representativeness criteria and the sector’s definition at the EU and national levels differ. Institutional designs imply structural misfits across levels, which unequally affect trade unions’ and employers’ capacities of representation. The findings raise both a challenge for quantitative research in European IR and policy implications for European institutions and trade unions’ strategies. I expect to soon discuss these preliminary findings in interviews with social partners at the EU level.







Besides two Theme 1 meetings, the very interesting visit to ILO and our mid-term Annual Colloquium in Wroclaw, I also attended several conferences and seminars outside the network (i.e. Europe at a crossroads, organized by ETUI http://www.etui.org/Events/Europe-at-a-crossroads.-Which-way-to-quality-jobs-and-prosperity







Allocation universelle: liberté ou précarité?, organized at the ULB http://fsp.ulb.ac.be/fr/conferencedebat-allocation-universelle-liberte-ou-precarite







I await now a coming seminar organized by Europe et Société in Paris on European sectoral social dialogue, where I expect to get a direct insight on employers’ views on EU sectoral social dialogue through informal participatory observation. Then, I will have my first lectures to Master students in Sociology of work at the ULB. This will be a short farewell-teaching experience, since I will start my secondment in Oviedo after the winter holidays! 







For those coming now to Belgium in secondment, I leave here a few curious but worthwhile visits related to the world of work which I recently discovered myself. Enjoy your stay!







Exhibition of Constantin Meunier (1831-1905) in Musée Royaux des Beaux Arts (Brussels), until 11 January 2015. He was a realist Belgian artist reputed for his sculptures of industrial workers, dockers and miners, and in tribute to Work: http://www.expo-meunier.be/en/home







Old Mining site in Le Bois du Cazier (Marcinelle), near Charleroi, which has been turned into a Museum of the Industry of Wallonie since a tragic accident occurred there in 1956. So it is like a memorial for miners and industrial workers: http://www.leboisducazier.be/







Museum about industry, labour and textile (Ghent). If you visit the lovely city of Ghent (I strongly recommend it) and need to warm up in the middle of the freezing Belgian winter, have a look at this charming exhibition on industrial history. Almost everything is in flemish, but despite this inconvenient for foreigners, a true Mule of Jenny spinning machine awaits you inside, which is a piece of history and symbol of the industrial revolution (Marx even mentioned it in The Capital, apparently).http://www.miat.gent.be/en







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ESR2 - Mona Aranea Guillén



As Early Stage Researcher and Phd Candidate placed at the University of Oviedo, Spain, I am doing research on employment relations in multinational corporations on the European level. My case studies are located in the steel sector and the insurance sector.







At the moment I am based at the European Trade Union Institute (ETUI) in Brussels. My term as an ETUI visiting researcher (Sept -Dec 2014) has been immensely fruitful in terms of data provision, academic training, dissemination of my research and personal networking. From January until March I will be on secondment at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) where I will be supervised by Pierre Desmarez at the Centre METICES.







At my home institution in Oviedo I have completed the first year as a Phd candidate. I have received valuable and encouraging feedback after presenting the state of my research at the sociology department’s annual “Phd Day” that took place in September.







Using initial findings from my fieldwork, I have written a paper on European Framework agreements that has met much interest at the Industrial Relations in Europe Conference (IREC) which took place in Dublin, Ireland in September. My presentation there was titled “European Framework Agreements (EFA) and the transnationalization of institutional power: the challenge of implementing the ArcelorMittal EFA in Germany and Spain”. The paper is currently under revision for the Changing Employment Research Paper series.



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ESR3 - Dragos Adascalitei



During the last couple of months I have been busy with writing up two papers based on fieldwork data from Romania. Both of them were submitted to journals which are supposed to come back to me with a reply by the end of January. In the meantime, I am busy with organizing the final details of my secondment at the International Labour Organization (ILO) which will start sooner than expected, on 15 of January 2015. As it looks now, at the ILO I will contribute to one of the chapters for the forthcoming publication 'World Employment and Social Outlook'. Besides, in the upcoming year I will work on two Changing Employment papers. The first one is a Theme 1 common paper that will compare workplace adjustments during the recent crisis in Spain and Romania. The second one, is a co-authored paper with Ben Egan, which will focus on the impact of migration on union organization in Romania and United Kingdom. Finally, I plan to spend a couple of weeks next year in Romani – doing fieldwork in an automotive plant.



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ESR5 – Karima Aziz



In September 2014 I moved to Wrocław, Poland, for my placement at the Institute of Sociology of the University of Wrocław. The timing was just right, because I had finished my fieldwork in the UK and came to Poland a couple of weeks before the academic semester officially started. That way I had the possibility to take advantage of the offer the university provides for international students like a two-weeks language course, welcome events and information days. Through this I learned a lot about the city and the university and met other people, who are also in Wrocław for the first time, which really made my start in Wrocław a lot easier. Later when the semester had started I also took advantage of the offer of lectures of the MA in intercultural mediation, the semester Polish language course and I try to integrate in the institute joining meetings of the department. I got the chance to stay in the same place as some of my theme colleagues, since when I arrived Radek was here and will come back again for his second round of Polish fieldwork and Mateusz came a month after my move back from his placement in Glasgow at the University of Strathclyde. This framework made my placement very enjoyable and despite me being worried about finding respondents I managed to find interviewees through contacts from interviewees in the UK, snow-balling in Poland, friends of friends and online calls especially on Facebook.



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ESR6 – Radek Polkowski



It has been a busy period since last newsletter. My secondment at the University of Wroclaw came to an end in September and right after this I went to north of Ireland to conduct follow-up interviews exactly one year after my first interviews. I stayed there for almost entire October, travelling across country to meet my interviewees. I also used this time to take videos and photos around Belfast for my short documentary film. In the beginning of December I will participate in the media training at CEU where I can work on the collected material. I have also presented my research at the PhD Away Day at the University of Strathclyde. In the meantime, I have been working on the working paper for ETUI, drafts for the theme 2’s special issue for FOCAAL, the chapter for our book project, and a chapter for my PhD thesis.



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ESR7 - Ben Egan



ESR7, Ben Egan recently completed his secondment at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow and has returned to Leuven to finalise his conceptual framework in anticipation for commencing field work in the New Year. He has also been engaged in various dissemination activities, which have served as a useful platform for feedback on the developing framework. These include the annual PhD symposium for the British Universities Industrial Relations Association, which was held in Leeds, and being a guest speaker for the Newcastle University Business School’s research seminar series.



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ESR8 – Mateusz Karolak



With the beginning of October I said goodbye to Glasgow and became a return migrant myself, again. The months which followed I mainly devoted to the writing up the newest findings from the fieldwork as well as to the preparation to the Network Annual Colloquium and after-all-not-so-scary Mid-term review. The interesting and enriching experience was also to coordinate the 3-days long visit of prof. Guy Standing at the University of Wrocław. Sometimes provocative statements of the author of The Precariat… became a good opportunity to discuss with other fellows What Is the Alternative, and how to deal with the T.I.N.A. approach. Hopefully we will continue our talks on the Changing Employment Blog. As for future, in the January I am moving to Brussels where I am going to have a placement at the European Trade Union Institute. Moreover I will also attend in the IMISCOE 3CI PhD Conference ‘Changing Europe – Changing Migration’: Europe in the World on the Move.  



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ESR9 – Nina Sahraoui



Since October I’m conducting fieldwork in Madrid with migrant care workers. It’s a great adventure and apart from very interesting interviews with the workers I had the chance to take part in the activities of various migrant associations. I’ve learned a lot through them and through their work. Living in Lavapies, a multicultural district of Madrid, I’ve also discovered a vibrant local community with many grassroots movements that enrich the neighborhood through arts and social engagement. Time goes by so fast but I’m trying to make the best out this very thought-provoking environment to take bits and pieces of this environment back with me. This fieldwork constitutes the third and last part of my fieldwork after having conducting similar interviews with migrant care workers in London and Paris. This 3-sited research has been incredibly enriching but I also have the feeling that the more I get to see and hear the more questions I have! 



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ESR10 – Pille Strauss-Raats



The time leading up to Christmas is beautiful in Sweden – there are lots of Christmas lights and manyoccasions for ‘fika’ with glögg and pepparkakor among friends and colleagues - an excellent time for social bonding and just to the point of my research!







The work itself is progressing as planned, with main focus on the questionnaire survey. The challenge here is finally being forced to ‘tune down’ my research area - so many aspects of the research context seem to be interesting and of course absolutely relevant for my research questions but it is time to admit that one project cannot cover it all. In addition to the continuing comparative focus on the regulation and outcomes for health and safety in agency work, the project is (re)turning deeper into the psychological processes of social support and wellbeing in this specific setting. I have been lucky to be able to take part in two research networks in these areas this fall through ESRC seminar series: the one on regulation of work and employment, lead by the Newcastle University Business School and another on current challenges in sustaining employee wellbeing, lead by the University of Edinburgh. Both seminar series have been very valuable for gaining theoretical understandings and an overview of current discussions in these fields. And of course, as always, it was good to exchange ideas within our own Changing Employment network during our annual colloquium in November – I am looking forward to putting all the valuable inputs to practice in the coming months.







For now, best Christmas wishes from beautiful Gothenburg! 



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ESR11 – Pedro Mendonca



The completion of theme 3 will be undoubtedly forever linked to Poland, where the ITN network school took place in November. It was in Wroclaw, Poland where the theme 3 met its final member and ER – Welcome to the ‘job quality’ Julia! Personally this is of much importance, because now I can practice and improve my Polish; and it also meant that I was introduced to one of the best dishes that I ever tried – pierogi – I prefer the baked ones to be honest! 



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ESR12 – Laurens Deprez



The Wroclaw network school came and went. I have to say I didn’t look forward to this, seeing as we would be evaluated by the EU commission and Poland not exactly being on the top of my ‘places to go’ list. The gazillion presentations and interviews to look forward to didn’t help either. As happens so often with that attitude, it went quite above expectations: Polish food is great, and I have never seen a city centre outside the lowlands look more like my native town than Wroclaw. Very surprising.







On a scientific note: I am being engrossed by the open source community and the interesting debates going on in there. Suddenly I have the feeling this makes my thesis a lot more relevant for society, which is a huge boost to my motivation. During the poster presentation in Wroclaw many people approached me and asked me for my contact data, so that is nice as well.



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